Targeted Fellowship, Internship, and Research opportunities for Students from Historically Underrepresented Groups

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Don’t you love diversity?

There are many fellowship, internship, and research opportunities out there (far too many to list on this blog), and a significant portion of these are specifically for students from groups that have had a historically small presence within particular disciplines and within the university overall. Historically Underrepresented Groups (HUGs as they are called institutionally) can include any number of populations but is associated overall with students from marginalized minority groups, particularly:

  • Underrepresented Minority Students (Usually referring to Black, Latinx, and Native American, Indigenous, and Pacific Islander students, but can be expanded to other groups depending on how it is defined).
  • First-Generation College Students (This term is used pretty generally, but can refer broadly to students who are of the first-generation in their family to attend a four-year college in America).
  • Low-Income Students (This one is also used pretty generally and can be relative based on the environment one is from and where one goes to college).

There are other opportunities that can also be looking for women broadly (especially in STEM fields), LGBTQ+ students, and students with disabilities.

Here we hope to list some of what is out there, especially ones for Brown students. We will try to keep this post updated as we become aware of new opportunities and hope this can be a resource as you try to figure out what you can and should be applying for.

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Smithsonian Fellowships

“This is a list of  current fellowship opportunities at the Smithsonian, sorted by unit. Use this list to get a better sense about where you might like to pursue a fellowship at the Smithsonian; click the links to dig deeper. You can also view all of the Smithsonian’s Fellowships by their deadlines here.”

Fellowship Opportunities

Royce Fellowship Application Tips-Kerri Heffernan

“Established in 1996 through the generosity of Charles Royce, a 1961 graduate of Brown University, the Royce Fellowship Program supports Brown University undergraduates as they carry out independent projects of their own design in locations across the United States and around the world. Along with funding, the program confers lifetime membership in the Society of Royce Fellows, a community of student scholars, faculty fellows, and Royce alumni that offers a forum for reflection, inquiry, and intellectual engagement within the university.

Every spring, up to twenty students at Brown are inducted into the Society of Royce Fellows, each receiving an award of up to $4,000 to pursue a research, curricular development, or public service project of his or her own design. The program seeks to enable undergraduates to explore their developing interests and passions and to extend the ideals of Brown’s open curriculum beyond the walls of the university”


Below are Royce Fellowship application tips from Kerri Heffernan

1. What organization and funding programs are you involved with at Brown (Basically what is your role for someone who doesn’t know you at all)?
I direct the Royce Fellowship. I oversee all aspects of the Fellowship including the application and selection process.
2. When is an appropriate time to begin thinking about the Royce Fellowship?
I think its good to begin thinking about independent research in your second year. It’s smart to understand what your options are for funding and support – and to understand what type of course work and experiences are going to help you craft a successful proposal. The application deadline for the Royce is February – I really encourage students to meet with me to discuss their ideas in October and November, It can take time to hone an idea, build a base of support, understand IRB protocols, get appropriate letters of support and work through multiple drafts.
3. What characteristics make an application particularly compelling in your eyes?
We fund a really diverse pool of student proposals – from bench science to composing an opera. The committee looks for proposals that are well crafted, creative, enthusiastically supported by a faculty sponsor and ‘doable’ in the time frame of the Fellowship. I tend to be drawn to proposals that tell me with great enthusiasm and rigor, why I should care about a nano gold particle, Columbia’s position on climate change or liturgical music in 1940’s New York.
4. Any tips for potential applicants?
Be sure you have a question. Many times students have a good idea but not a real ‘question’. Before applying meet with current or former Fellows and the director to better understand the types of projects that the Fellowship funds. Talk about the scope of work, the expectations for a product and the types of support you can expect.

Fellowships and Scholarships for the Arts

Take a look at this great listing of opportunities for students in the arts provided by NYUs Tisch School of the Arts.
“This guide is intended for students in the performing, cinematic and related arts who are
currently pursuing degrees at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. The guide includes U.S.
government, international, corporate, and private funding agencies that support graduate and undergraduate study and research. Information is included for both U.S. citizens and foreign nationals.

The Guide to Scholarships, Fellowships and Grants for students is structured to give you a brief description of each funding source, its purpose in offering the award, award amounts, application requirements, restrictions, deadlines, and contact information. The Office of Student Affairs has made every possible effort to ensure that the information included in this guide is up-to-date. However, given the precarious nature of financial support for artists and the arts, you should contact any funding source of which you may be eligible prior to applying in order to verify award information, deadlines, and protocols.

This guide does not present an exhaustive list of financial aid opportunities. Our aim is to get you started in the right direction. This guide offers a broad overview of the many kinds of sources of funding available; you should continue your search for funding beyond the
opportunities listed in this guide. At the conclusion of this listing you will find a listing of
financial aid reference materials.”

https://tisch.nyu.edu/content/dam/tisch/student-affairs/AcademicServiceForms/guidestoscholarships20152016.pdf

 

TRIALS Law Summer Program

“Trials is a unique partnership of NYU School of Law, Harvard Law School, and the Advantage Testing Foundation. It is a fully subsidized summer study program for students of modest means whose backgrounds are currently underrepresented at the nation’s top law schools.

For five weeks in the summer, Trials students take residence at Harvard or New York University. The residency alternates from year to year.

Each week, senior instructors from Advantage Testing prepare Trials students for the LSAT by deconstructing the test and presenting a step-by-step approach to each question type. Students maintain a rigorous practice testing schedule, frequently sitting for full-length official LSATs under simulated testing conditions. Working closely with their instructors, students learn to develop an individualized study plan, focus their preparation, and apply the core principles they master.

Trials students also attend lectures presented by prominent lawyers, public figures, and legal scholars, including distinguished faculty from both NYU Law and Harvard Law School. These lectures provide a wide-ranging introduction to the study and practice of the law while giving students the opportunity to ask specific questions related to their particular fields of interest.

Perhaps most important, Trials allows students to experience communities similar to those they will encounter in law school. Students form study groups to challenge, motivate, and inspire one another. In lunches with instructors and speakers, students can take part in informal discussions to learn more about the law, their peers, and themselves.

Finally, Trials is committed to taking full advantage of the resources of its host locations. Students enter the field in Boston and New York City to meet with and observe lawyers at work, garnering practical experience that complements the academic curriculum.”

http://trials.atfoundation.org/program/index

 

STEM POSTBACCALAUREATE INTRAMURAL RESEARCH TRAINING AWARD

Program Description:  The NIH Postbac IRTA program (CRTA, Cancer Research Training Award, in the National Cancer Institute) provides recent college graduates who are planning to apply to graduate or professional (medical/dental/pharmacy) school an opportunity to spend one or two years performing full-time research at the NIH. Postbac IRTAs/CRTAs work side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research. The NIH consists of the 240-bed Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center and more than 1200 laboratories/research projects located on the main campus in Bethesda, MD and the surrounding area as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Hamilton, MT; Framingham, MA; and Detroit, MI.

You can identify NIH investigators with projects that interest you by searching the NIH Intramural Annual Reports. Use the text search feature to find project descriptions that contain the key words you enter.  You can then find contact information for the investigators in the NIH Enterprise Directory.

Each postbac has a scientific “home” in the NIH Institute or Center (IC) of his/her principal investigator (PI).  The IC manages all of the administrative details of the postbac appointment and the IC training office provides a variety of scientific and career enrichment activities.  The NIH-wide Office of Intramural Training & Education sponsors a wide range of career and professional development activities for postbacs, including skills workshops on topics such as oral and poster presentations and reading a scientific paper; workshops on getting to graduate school and getting to professional school; career exploration sessions; a Graduate & Professional School Fair; and Postbac Poster Day. The NIH provides a wealth of additional scientific seminars.

Eligibility: The Postbac IRTA/CRTA Program is for college graduates who received their bachelor’s degrees less than two years prior to the date they begin the program. To be eligible, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. In addition, they must intend to apply to graduate or professional school during their tenure in the program. The general expectation is that applicants will have received their bachelor’s degrees from accredited colleges or universities in the U.S. U.S. citizens whose degrees are from other nations may apply for a waiver of this requirement. Permanent residents must have received their bachelor’s degrees from accredited U.S. institutions to be eligible to participate.”

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/postbac_irta

College Advising Corps Fellowship

“The College Advising Corps (CAC) at Brown University is a full-time AmeriCorps program that seeks to increase the number of first-generation college bound, low-to-moderate income, and underrepresented high school and community college students who enter and persist in college and earn bachelor’s degrees.

The CAC achieves this mission by placing recent college graduates to serve as full-time College Advisers in under-served schools across Rhode Island. College Advisers provide college application and financial aid guidance to students and their families while fostering a culture of college attendance and higher education in Rhode Island’s urban communities. The CAC currently serves students at 13 high schools in 6 school districts as well students at the Community College of Rhode Island.

This posting is for several, full-time College Advisers to serve CAC partner schools across RI. The position begins August 1, 2016 and runs through June 30, 2017.

Compensation will include a gross taxable living allowance of $17, 000 for the program year, an education award, and health insurance.

The position requires a commitment to complete one full program year (August through June). Minimum daily hours are 8:00AM to 4:00PM depending on school and program training schedules.”

Deadline Friday April 8th

https://www.brown.edu/academics/college/special-programs/public-service/college-advising-corps

Civic Engagement Fellowship- Hope Reichbach Fund Fellowship

“The Hope Reichbach Memorial Fund provides scholarships for students who take internships in civic leadership and community organizing.  The Fund aims to continue Hope Reichbach’s legacy of progressive values and passion for Brooklyn.

Candidates must have completed their freshman or sophomore year of college; show demonstrable financial need; excel academically; are active in their communities; show leadership potential, have an interest in mentorship and professional development; are passionate about social change and community and public service work, and are interested in interested in working in Brooklyn-based organizations. Each student will receive $300 per week of full time work.  Internships must run between 8-12 weeks long.”

 

http://www.hopeforbrooklyn.com/

Fellowships Search Engine

If you are on the hunt for fellowships, check out profellow.com

 

“Fellowships are short-term, competitive, funded opportunities to do something exceptional. Cofounder Vicki Johnson applied to and earned several fellowships throughout her career, but found that some of the best fellowship opportunities were buried on obscure websites. Vicki and Ryan Johnson founded ProFellow in 2011 to serve as the go-to source of information on professional and academic fellowships. Since that time, ProFellow has attracted the largest online community of active fellowship seekers in the world. Vicki and Ryan visit universities throughout the United States to provide seminars on how to find and earn competitive fellowships. Vicki also founded the International Fellows Network to facilitate cross-disciplinary networks of current and former fellows working on exceptional projects, research and enterprises.”

 

 

https://www.profellow.com/blog/